Can We Survive a “Twitter Presidency”?

Bryan Crabtree,

A lot of the “experts” are suggesting that President-elect Donald Trump could “slip” in one of his Tweets and reveal classified information. Some go so far as to suggest that Trump could start a war with his tweets.

These suggestions are little more than the same analyst-buffoons who predicted Trump would never get close to the Republican nomination, let alone win the presidency. For that matter, why couldn’t the president slip during a press conference and reveal classified information?

The vast majority of the political experts and media analysts don’t understand Twitter. This reminds me of the days when I was running my real estate brokerage and I had to make adjustments to agents’ commission schedule. Regardless of the nature of those changes, they were always met with resistance.

Human beings in general loathe change. And the media “humans” are not accustomed to being bypassed in terms of access to the White House. They’re either going to have to learn how to use Twitter, or they will be left behind. To continue to complain and predict failure as a result of Trump’s “tweeting” will result in a predictable outcome. They’ll be as irrelevant as were their predictions of who would win the presidency.

Not only can we survive a Twitter presidency, it will finally bring the needed advances with regard to America’s political discussion and enlightenment. For too long the mainstream media has controlled what you and I get to know. For years, “the truth” has been a very cloudy proposition.

There will undoubtedly be a foreign crisis resulting from one of Trump’s tweets. There will be numerous protests as fallout from Trump’s “140 characters or less.” Some Republicans (including maybe even Trump himself) will suffer a loss of political capital resulting from one of his tweets.

Yes! There will be members of the media, politicians, foreign leaders, and businesses all subjected to the potential embarrassment of the “Twitter presidency.” But each of these so-called shocking moments will be rooted in candor, fulfilling campaign promises and exposing truth.

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 As a nation, we have become allergic to the harsh truths that are needed to shape our future and serve as a catalyst to better decision-making.

We will not only survive a Trump Twitter presidency, we will probably be better for it.

So far, Trump has used Twitter to convince Carrier to save nearly 1,000 American jobs, Ford to create 700 new ones and scrap the idea of a $1.6 million plant in Mexico (an American job killer). He’s put Boeing on notice that the costs for the new Air Force One project are way out of line and he’s offered Boeing an opportunity to bid for Lockheed Martin’s F-35 fighter jet program whose costs overruns are approaching a half-trillion dollars.

Trump wasn’t elected to protect the stock market, big business, political elites or Hollywood stars. He was elected to bring jobs back to America and end the era of ceding our future competing countries and markets.

This is just the beginning of his tweeting. The message from a Twitter president is, “don’t take advantage of the United States if you’re a foreign country.” If you’re an American business, the message is clear: “keep your jobs here or you’ll face penalties when you ship your goods back to America for us to buy them.”

The business community is not complaining about a Twitter presidency: they are changing their business model to embrace it and profit from it.

No amount of analysis decrying the use of Twitter as a communication tool is going to slow it down or stop it. You’ll either embrace the Twitter presidency and find opportunity in it, or it will be your undoing.

Average Americans were able to trade Ford and GM stock last week (because of his tweets) just as quickly as big Wall Street firms. I suppose the “big money elites” want us to be afraid of the cost of a Twitter presidency because it reverses the advantageous flow of political policy from “Donors first, Wall Street second, then everyone else” to everyone all at once.

Who gains an advantage when the president goes straight to the people? The people do.

Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt used the “fireside chats” via a little-known broadcast medium called radio to change the way a president reaches the people. Pres. John F. Kennedy used the then-new television medium to communicate to America. Those revolutionary moments were equally as radical, yet wholly effective. Now Trump is using Twitter to earn political capital by reaching the masses. 

We are about to watch a media and communications revolution driven by the White House not seen since Roosevelt or Kennedy.