Most Heroin Use In The U.S. Stems From Mexican Drug Cartels

Aaron Bandler,

A new report from the State Department shows that the overwhelming majority of heroin consumption can be traced to Mexican drug cartels.

According to the Washington Free Beacon, the report stated that 90-94 percent of the heroin consumed is from Mexico. One of the main reasons for this is because the drug cartels have focused on producing heroin in Mexico instead of South America, which lowers costs and causes heroin to be sold at a cheaper value.

Additionally, the increase of fentanyl is also enabling the drug cartels, as not only is fentanyl cheap and easy to hide from law enforcement, it’s an incredibly potent drug that is a significant factor in the rise in opioid deaths. Assistant Secretary of State William Brownfield told reporters “fentanyl is 10-50 times as potent as heroin and when the user does not realize that he or she is consuming fentanyl and not consuming heroin the likelihood of overdose and death is extremely increased.”

“In certain cities, Chicago comes to mind, where in a single evening, due to a poorly advertised batch of fentanyl, we lost more than 30 people in a single night,” Brownfield said.

stopheroin_small Most Heroin Use In The U.S. Stems From Mexican Drug Cartels News

Indeed, the Mexican drug cartels have only grown since Mexico has been unable to quash them; largely due to the fact that local law enforcement in the country refuses go after the cartels, leaving Mexico’s military in the uncomfortable position of focusing on the cartels. The Mexican drug cartels have now become the country’s biggest crime syndicate when it comes to drugs.

Assistant Secretary of State William Brownfield told reporters “fentanyl is 10-50 times as potent as heroin and when the user does not realize that he or she is consuming fentanyl and not consuming heroin the likelihood of overdose and death is extremely increased.”

Meanwhile, the economic hardship has increased demand for heroin and opioids, and between the demand and burgeoning supply from the drug cartels the country now faces a serious heroin and opioids crisis. The number of deaths stemming from heroin overdose has increased six-fold from 2002 to 2015, with 2015 being the first year where there were more heroin deaths than gun deaths.

For more on the heroin and opioid epidemic and how it relates to the drug war, read the Daily Wire’s primers on them here and here.