Omaha toddler in viral Ďthugí video has been taken into protective custody

 The Nebraska tot, who unleashed tantrum of curses and slurs, was one of four children removed from the unidentified house. The Omaha Police Officers Association created controversy for posting video to educate about the ‘terrible cycle of violence and thuggery.’ Critics called the post racist and unnecessary.
 
This unidentified toddler, the subject of a viral video posted by the Omaha Police Officers Association to illustrate the culture of “violence” and “thuggery,” has been taken into protective custody.

This unidentified toddler has been taken into protective custody after a video of him posted by the Omaha Police Officers Association to illustrate the culture of ‘violence’ and ‘thuggery’ went viral.

The Nebraska toddler who unleashed an R-rated tirade in a viral video has been placed into protective custody, officials said.

The little boy — clad only in his diaper — pushed over a chair, flipped the bird and unleashed a stream of curses and slurs, including b—h, f–k and the N-word.

Although there was no criminality, police and local Child Protective Services visited the family home and found safety concerns. The agency removed four children, officials said.

In the minute-long clip, more than 30 obscenities are uttered by both the tot and the man and woman off-camera.

In the minute-long clip, more than 30 obscenities are uttered by both the tot and the man and woman off-camera.

Police have not released the identity of the parents or the children taken out of the home.

The Omaha Police Officers Association was previously slammed by area civil rights groups for lifting the lewd video of the Facebook page of a local gang member and offering its own commentary on the state of “terrible cycle of violence and thuggery.”

“The whole point of this is to give an unfiltered view of what police officers deal with every day,” said Sgt. John Wells, president of the Omaha Police Officers Association.

The Omaha Police Officers' Association took heat for posting the video, with critics saying it demeaned the child and only further hampered race relations in Nebraska.

Omaha Police Officers Association

The Omaha Police Officers’ Association took heat for posting the video, with critics saying it demeaned the child and only further hampered race relations in Nebraska.

As the controversy appeared to be hitting a boiling point earlier this week, the cop union stuck to its guns. The group posted a second, tamer, video on its Facebook page Tuesday of an Australian public service advertisement warning of children mimicking bad behavior by adults.

“Think people….think,” the group wrote on its Facebook page. “What are we doing to our kids?”

The baby — clad only in a diaper — flips the bird at one point in the video.

The baby — clad only in a diaper — flips the bird at one point in the video.

The group also thanked media outlets, such as CNN, for creating a “discussion” on the issue.

But critics said the raw video had clear racial undertones and reinforced negative stereotypes.

“It’s almost like the kid was abused twice: once by the people in the video and once by the police officers association,” said Willie Hamilton, executive director of Black Men United in Omaha, which promotes mentoring programs to strengthen families.

The union has stuck to its guns: It later took to Facebook to post a video from an Australian public service message that showed children mimicking lewd behavior.

Omaha Police Officers Association

The union has stuck to its guns: It later took to Facebook to post a video from an Australian public service message that showed children mimicking lewd behavior.

Omaha Police Chief Todd Schmaderer distanced his department from the video’s posting and attempted to draw a clear separation between the union and the force.

“I strongly disagree with any postings that may cause a divide in our community or an obstacle to police community relations,” Schmaderer said.

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