Rachel Jeantel and the Sorry State of Black Education

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The George Zimmerman trial is about a lot of things. One thing that’s getting little attention is the sorry state of black education in many parts of America.

 

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“Rachel Jeantel, a witness for the prosecution in the George Zimmerman murder trial, put a face on it for the nation to see. Some of that evidence unfolded when Zimmerman’s defense attorney asked 19-year-old Jeantel to read a letter that she allegedly had written to Trayvon Martin’s mother. She responded that she doesn’t read cursive, and that’s in addition to her poor grammar, syntax and communication skills.”

I felt sorry for Rachel Jeantel. Without an education, she’s going to have years of struggle. It’s not too late for her. She could re-make herself if she had some help. Instead, so-called black leaders are threatening the possibility of race riots if George Zimmerman is found “not guilty.”

And what about the sorry state of education for many blacks? More government . . .  more money . . . more Democrat voters to keep the same people in power who have created a dependent and compliant voting class.

Jeantel is not a high school dropout. She’s a senior at Miami Norland High School. Walter Williams writes:

“How in the world did she manage to become a 12th-grader without being able to read cursive writing? That’s a skill one would expect from a fourth-grader. Jeantel is by no means an exception at her school. Here are a few achievement scores from her school: Thirty-nine percent of the students score basic for reading, and 38 percent score below basic.”

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Booker T. Washington (1856-1915)

Booker T. Washington had a great deal to say about how black leaders exploit their own race for financial and political gain. The following is from Washington’s My Larger Education (1911):

“There is another class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs, and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs — partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays. Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs.

“A story told me by a colored man in South Carolina will illustrate how people sometimes get into situations where they do not like to part with their grievances. In a certain community there was a  colored doctor of the old school, who knew little about modern ideas of medicine, but who in some way had gained the confidence of the people and had made considerable money by his own peculiar methods of treatment. In this community there was an old lady who happened to be pretty well provided with this world’s goods and who thought that she had a cancer. For twenty years she had enjoyed the luxury of having this old doctor treat her for that cancer. As the old doctor became — thanks to the cancer and to other practice — pretty well-to-do, he decided to send one of his boys to a medical college. After graduating from the medical school, the young man returned home, and his father took a vacation. During this time the old lady who was afflicted with the “cancer” called in the young man, who treated her; within a few weeks the cancer (or what was supposed to be the cancer) disappeared, and the old lady declared herself well.

“When the father of the boy returned and found the patient on her feet and perfectly well, he was outraged. He called the young man before him and said:  ‘My son, I find that you have cured that cancer case of mine. Now, son, let me tell you something. I educated you on that cancer. I put you through high school, through college, and finally through the medical school on that cancer. And now you, with your new ideas of practicing medicine, have come here and cured that cancer. Let me tell you, son, you have started all wrong. How do you expect to make a living practicing medicine in that way?’

 “I am afraid that there is a certain class of race problem solvers who don’t want the patient to get well, because as long as the disease holds out they have not only an easy means of making a living, but also an easy medium through which to make themselves prominent before the public.”

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  • Jay Jay Haskins

    Not being able to read cursive is not exclusively minority or low income. Many school districts don't teach it anymore. Most private grammar schools still do. She does seem to be lacking social skills and public speaking. She also was just sort of s l o w sounding and disrespectful to boot.