Trump on the Rise: Polls show gap narrowing, All Aboard the #TrumpTrain

Kathryn Blackhurst,

Donald Trump is rising in recent polls against Hillary Clinton, pulling even in some national surveys and jumping into the lead in some key battleground states.

Although national polls are often discounted so far from Election Day, the shifting numbers depicting the presumptive Republican nominee gaining ground on the presumptive Democratic nominee mark an important trend in the national pulse. Even though the Electoral College will play a huge role in the election process, Trump’s gains in the results of several important polls show that Clinton cannot rest on her laurels.

“New Quinnipiac poll out – we are going to win the whole deal – and MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN! #Trump2016!”

A USA Today/Suffolk poll released Monday showed the gap between the two candidates had closed to 5 points. That same survey found Clinton leading by 11 points two months ago. A poll from Gravis released Saturday found the gap within the margin of error with a 2 percent Clinton lead.

trumptrain_small Trump on the Rise: Polls show gap narrowing, All Aboard the #TrumpTrain

Polls released “New Q[uinnipiac] poll out – we are going to win the whole deal – and MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN! #Trump2016,” Trump tweeted last week after seeing some of the favorable poll results.

Sure enough, the results from the Quinnipiac University poll, released just ahead of the two over the holiday weekend, on June 29 showed that Clinton had a barely discernible lead over Trump — deemed “too close to call” — of 42 percent to 40 percent in a matchup between the two. These results stand in stark contrast to a June 1 poll from the same source that showed Clinton leading Trump 45 to 41 percent. If the Libertarian and Green Party candidates are added to the mix, two percentage points still separate Clinton from Trump at 39 percent to 37 percent.

In addition, the most recent Quinnipiac poll offered some interesting matchup results for various categories. Although 58 percent of those polled said that Clinton was better prepared to act as president than Trump, 45 percent thought that Trump was more honest and trustworthy than Clinton, and 49 percent thought of Trump as a stronger leader. As for individual issues, although 51 percent thought that Clinton would respond best in an international crisis, 52 percent believed that Trump would be better at creating jobs and 52 percent thought that Trump would be more effective with handling ISIS and the threat of Islamic extremism.

Trump experienced even more favorable results with the most recent Rasmussen poll released on Thursday. An online survey found of likely U.S. voters found that 43 percent would vote for Trump over Clinton, with 12 percent supporting a third candidate and 5 percent remaining undecided. The survey results from the previous week awarded Clinton 44 percent and saw Trump trailing with 39 percent. The Rasmussen poll also showed Trump with 75 percent of the GOP vote and 14 percent of the Democratic vote, with Clinton garnering 76 percent of the Democratic vote and 10 percent of the GOP vote.

Even the liberal-leaning Public Policy Polling results showed a narrowing of the gap between the two presumptive nominees, with Clinton leading Trump in a direct matchup by only 4 percent of the vote at 48 to 44 percent results. The PPP poll also noted that Trump led Clinton with crossover votes, garnering 10 percent of Democrats to Clinton’s 7 percent of GOP voters. This survey also noticed a trend between those who support Trump for president and those who supported Brexit — the United Kingdom’s removal from the European Union — with a 68 to 14 percent favorability. Clinton’s supporters, on the other hand, favored Britain remaining in the E.U. at 48 to 19 percent, with 34 percent of anti-Trumpers expressing no opinions whatsoever.

The results of these three major polls show the gap narrowing between Clinton and Trump, with some cases even showing Trump surpassing Clinton on distinct issues. As the primaries come to an official close this month and the stakes are even higher, the bitter battle for the general election rages on.